Video Shows What It’s Really Like for Teens in Solitary Confinement


 PLEASE; NOTE:  49 SIGNED MY PETITION FOR TO BAN SOLITARY CONFINEMENT FOR CHILDREN –  FINALLY I HAD TO CLOSE IT

Video Shows What It’s Really Like for Teens in Solitary Confinement

Spending 300 days in a room alone isn’t how most teens grow to become healthy adults.

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September 26, 2014

 

Ismael Nazario was awaiting trial for robbery when he was sent to solitary confinement at Rikers Island for the first time.

He was 16, and he ended up at the notorious New York City prison because, by his own description, he had fallen in with the wrong crowd after years of being on the honor roll. He was raised by a single mom who was diagnosed with cancer when he was 13, and as her health faded, so did Nazario’s interest in grades.

In the video we hear from Nazario about the sights and sounds of solo lockdown and the painful effect spending days in a six-by-eight-foot cell can have on a young teen. He spent more than 300 days in the tiny room inmates call “the box” before even being convicted of a crime.

Rikers rules say teens can be sent to the box for being loud or annoying to staff—at any given time it’s estimated that 100 teens are being held in solitary there.

As the Center for Investigative Reporting puts it, “Every day, thousands of teenagers around the U.S. are held in solitary confinement, but no one knows for sure how many.”

Which is part of the fear that so many have when they’re in solitary: the fear they’ve been forgotten.4p48v3jdykosdb7h9hcv_normal

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